Raleigh, Durham: The Best Cities for Baby Boomers Looking for Jobs

title=

Rapidly growing economies and growing populations make the Research Triangle stand out when hiring older adults, who come to North Carolina with work experience, LinkedIn says.

The Research Triangle has been named the best metro area for hiring baby boomers, according to new analysis from LinkedIn’s Economic Graph team.

The Research Triangle group of cities – including Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill – took the top spot on the list of 15 metropolitan areas.

Second and third place went to Austin, Texas and North Port-Sarasota, Florida respectively.

For the full report, visit linkedin.com/pulse.

Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill: #1 for Hiring Baby Boomers

“At the top of the list is North Carolina’s Research Triangle group of cities (Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill). The rapidly growing economy and growing population of this region creates opportunities for all generations. But it’s worth taking a closer look at the unique factors that make this metro area a winner for baby boomers,” the LinkedIn report said.

“This technical/academic tilt towards the economics of the Research Triangle can be a boon for older candidates, in terms of recognition for expertise that has taken decades to build. Two other Metros on the top-12 list — No. 2 Austin and No. 8 Boston — also have similar dynamics.

HARD__Old-Well.jpeg
The old well on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Courtesy, UNC-Chapel Hill

Here’s how the report was made: Economic Graph researchers found the US cities with the largest shares of LinkedIn members considered baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) who added an employer to their profile in 2021 the same month a new job started, the LinkedIn report says. Cities were ranked by their share of baby boomer hires.

How many baby boomers and seniors telecommute?

The chart below, using BLS Covid-19 Effects data, shows the percentage of workers telecommuting (or working remotely) by age group for the past year.

Here are some highlights:

The percentage of teleworkers in oldest category of employees (65 years and over) has almost fell by half over the past year. In June 2021, 11.2% of workers aged 65 and over were working from home. In April 2022, according to the latest available data, 6.1% of workers in this age group were working from home.

The percentage of teleworkers in second oldest category of workers (55 to 64 years old) also almost fell by half over the past year. In June 2021, 13.7% of workers aged 55 to 64 were working from home. In April 2022, according to the latest available data, 7.2% of workers in this age group were working from home.

Raleigh News & Observer related stories

Kimberly Cataudella (her) is a duty reporter for The News & Observer.

Comments are closed.