Cluster analysis – Top Clusters http://topclusters.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:42:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://topclusters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-100x100.png Cluster analysis – Top Clusters http://topclusters.org/ 32 32 The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) offers free products and services https://topclusters.org/the-cybersecurity-and-infrastructure-security-agency-cisa-offers-free-products-and-services/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:39:16 +0000 https://topclusters.org/the-cybersecurity-and-infrastructure-security-agency-cisa-offers-free-products-and-services/ by Jim Masters • November 21, 2022 As an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security, a key part of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s (CISA) mission is to help businesses improve their security capabilities. To this end, CISA offers free cybersecurity products and services. Five free offers from CISA CISA Cyber […]]]>

As an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security, a key part of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s (CISA) mission is to help businesses improve their security capabilities. To this end, CISA offers free cybersecurity products and services.

Five free offers from CISA

CISA Cyber ​​Hygiene Vulnerability Scanning Services is available by emailing: vulnerability@cisa.dhs.gov. Scanning will begin within three days and you’ll start receiving reports within two weeks, according to CISA. Once launched, this service is mostly automated and requires little direct interaction.

The Cyber ​​Security Assessment Tool (CSET) provides organizations with a structured and repeatable approach to assess the security posture of their cyber systems and networks. It includes both high-level questions and detailed questions related to all industrial computer and control systems.

CISA offers a checklist for implementing cybersecurity measures. The document outlines four goals for your organization:

  • Reduce the likelihood of a damaging cyber incident
  • Detect malicious activity quickly
  • Respond effectively to confirmed incidents
  • Maximize resilience

CISA Catalog of known exploited vulnerabilities (KEV) helps organizations identify known software security vulnerabilities. The KEV Catalog allows you to find software used by your organization and, if necessary, update it to the latest version according to the vendor’s instructions.

The Malcolm Network Traffic Analysis Tool Suite is made up of several widely used open-source tools, making it an attractive alternative to security solutions that require paid licenses, CISA said. The tool accepts network traffic data in the form of Full Packet Capture (PCAP) files and Zeek logs.

Visibility into network communications is provided through two interfaces:

  • OpenSearch Dashboards – a data visualization plugin with dozens of pre-built dashboards providing at-a-glance overview of network protocols
  • Arkime — a tool for searching and identifying network sessions with suspected security incidents

Learn more about Malcolm

All communication with Malcolm, both from the UI and from remote log senders, is secured with industry-standard encryption protocols, CISA said. Malcolm operates as a cluster of Docker containers – isolated sandboxes that each perform a dedicated system function.

Although all of the open source tools that make up Malcolm are already available and widely used, Malcolm provides an interconnectivity framework to make it greater than the sum of its parts. There are many other network traffic scanning solutions available, ranging from full Linux distributions like Security Onion to licensed products like Splunk Enterprise Security.

However, the creators of Malcolm believe that its easy deployment and robust combination of tools fills a void in the network security space that will make network traffic analysis accessible to many people in the public and private sectors as well as to individual enthusiasts, CISA said.

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The global high performance computing industry is https://topclusters.org/the-global-high-performance-computing-industry-is/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 09:53:40 +0000 https://topclusters.org/the-global-high-performance-computing-industry-is/ Dublin, Nov. 18, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “High Performance Computing (HPC) Market with COVID-19 Impact Analysis, by Component, Compute Type (Parallel Computing, Distributed Computing and Exascale Computing), Industry, deployment, “Server Price Band, Verticals & Region – Global Forecast to 2027” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The global high-performance computing (HPC) market […]]]>

Dublin, Nov. 18, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “High Performance Computing (HPC) Market with COVID-19 Impact Analysis, by Component, Compute Type (Parallel Computing, Distributed Computing and Exascale Computing), Industry, deployment, “Server Price Band, Verticals & Region – Global Forecast to 2027” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global high-performance computing (HPC) market is expected to grow from USD 36.0 billion in 2022 to USD 49.9 billion by 2027, at a CAGR of 6.7%.

The large enterprise segment is expected to hold a higher market share during the forecast period

Organizations with more than 1,000 employees are considered large enterprises. As the adoption of new digital technologies increases, many large enterprises have replaced their traditional data center infrastructure technologies and other business processes with HPC systems and solutions. Large enterprises are typically characterized by high server densities and high computing power requirements.

These organizations require a highly reliable infrastructure. HPC solutions can help data center providers with fast processing capabilities and deliver fast results, thereby increasing their profitability. In addition, HPC solutions help large enterprises to process many applications simultaneously in a short period of time, allowing a significant reduction in downtime.

On-Premises Deployment of HPC to Hold the Largest Market Share Over the Forecast Period

The on-premises deployment consists of various dedicated computing nodes which are attached to their parent nodes and further connected to workstations. This type of deployment supports specialized hardware, such as InfiniBand and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU).

However, the emergence of HPC in the cloud has affected the growth of the on-premises deployment type segment. Yet, organizations are deploying HPC solutions using the on-premises deployment type due to security and privacy considerations. Many vendors continue to invest in the on-premises type of deployment, as well as developing new cloud business models for HPC. Major vendors offering on-premises HPC solutions include HPE, IBM, and Dell.

Main topics covered:

1. Introduction

2. Research methodology

3. Executive Summary

4. Premium Previews
4.1 Attractive Growth Opportunities in High Performance Computing Market
4.2 High Performance Computing Market, By Component
4.3 High Performance Computing Market, By Component and Region
4.4 High Performance Computing Market, by Country

5. Market Overview
5.1 Presentation
5.2 Market Dynamics
5.2.1 Drivers
5.2.1.1 Growing Need for Efficient Compute, High Scalability, and Reliable Storage
5.2.1.2 Increasing demand for high speed data processing with precision
5.2.1.3 Increased Use of High Performance Computing and Deep Learning Frameworks in COVID-19 Vaccine Development
5.2.1.4 Growing Demand for High Performance Computing (HPC) Systems in Genomics Research
5.2.2 Constraints
5.2.2.1 Cybersecurity issues
5.2.2.2 High Deployment Costs Associated with Commercial High Performance Computing (HPC) Clusters
5.2.3 Opportunities
5.2.3.1 Increased focus on adoption of hybrid high-performance computing (HPC) systems
5.2.3.2 Introduction of the exascale calculation
5.2.3.3 Increased investment in data centers supporting HPC capacity
5.2.4 Challenges
5.2.4.1 Less technical expertise related to high performance computing (HPC)
5.2.4.2 Limited SME budgets
5.2.4.3 Cooling challenges for HPC systems
5.2.4.4 Requirement for advanced frameworks to improve fault tolerance and provide resiliency
5.3 Value chain analysis
5.4 Technology Analysis
5.5 Ecosystem analysis
5.6 Trends/disruptions affecting customers
5.7 Case studies
5.7.1 Case Study 1: Education
5.7.2 Case study 2: Energy and utilities
5.7.3 Case Study 3: Education
5.8 Porter’s Five Forces Analysis
5.9 Price Analysis
5.10 Business Analysis
5.11 Key conferences and events between 2022 and 2023
5.12 Key Players and Purchase Criteria
5.13 Regulations and standards
5.14 Regulators, Government Agencies and Other Organizations

6. High Performance Computing Market, By Component
6.1 Presentation
6.1.1 Drivers: High Performance Computing Market for Components
6.1.2 Impact of COVID-19
6.2 Workarounds
6.2.1 Server
6.2.1.1 Supercomputer and divisional systems
6.2.1.2 Departmental and workgroup systems
6.2.2 Storage
6.2.3 Networking Devices
6.2.4 Software
6.3 Services
6.3.1 Design and advice
6.3.2 Integration and deployment

7. High Performance Computing Market, By Compute Type
7.1 Presentation
7.2 Parallel calculation
7.2.1 Parallel Computing Helps Solve Complex Mathematical Problems
7.2.2 Case study: Aws and AstraZeneca
7.2.3 Bitwise parallelism
7.2.4 Instruction level parallelism
7.2.5 Task parallelism
7.3 Distributed computing
7.3.1 Distributed Computing Helps Leverage HPC Resources Using Low-Value Commodity Hardware
7.3.2 Use case: Dell and Walt Disney Animation Studio
7.3.3 Grid calculation
7.3.4 Cluster computing
7.3.5 Cloud Computing
7.3.5.1 Use case: fraud detection in the Bfsi sector
7.4 Exascale calculation
7.4.1 Exascale computing helps to make new scientific discoveries by processing large amounts of data in a short time
7.4.2 Use case: vaccine development

8. High Performance Computing Market, By Deployment
8.1 Presentation
8.1.1 Drivers: High Performance Computing Market for Deployment Type
8.1.2 Impact of COVID-19
8.2 Cloud
8.3 Onsite

9. High Performance Computing Market, By Organization Size
9.1 Presentation
9.1.1 Drivers: High Performance Computing Market for Organization Size
9.1.2 Impact of COVID-19
9.2 Small and medium enterprises
9.3 Large companies

10. High Performance Computing Market, By Server Price Band
10.1 Presentation
10.2 USD 250,000-500,000 and more
10.2.1 The $250,000-$500,000+ Server Price Range Includes Systems That Help Solve Highly Complex Mathematical Problems
10.3 USD 250,000-100,000 and under
10.3.1 The price range of servers between USD 250,000 and USD 100,000 and below includes systems capable of solving moderately complex mathematical problems

11. High Performance Computing Market, By Vertical
11.1 Presentation
11.1.1 Drivers: High Performance Computing Market for Vertical
11.1.2 Impact of COVID-19
11.2 Government and Defense
11.3 Banking, financial services and insurance (Bfsi)
11.4 Education and research
11.4.1 Recent Developments
11.5 Manufacturing
11.6 Media and Entertainment
11.7 Health and Life Sciences
11.8 Energy and Utilities
11.9 Earth Sciences
11.10 Others

12. High Performance Computing Market, By Region

13. Competitive landscape
13.1 Key Player Strategies/Right to Win
13.2 Overview
13.3 Top 5 Companies Analysis
13.4 Market Share Analysis (2021)
13.5 Business Valuation Quadrant, 2021
13.5.1 Star
13.5.2 Generalized
13.5.3 Emerging Leader
13.5.4 Participant
13.6 SME Assessment Quadrant, 2021
13.6.1 Progressive Enterprise
13.6.2 Responsive business
13.6.3 Dynamic Enterprise
13.6.4 Starting block
13.7 Competitive Scenario

14. Company Profiles
14.1 Key Players
14.1.1 Advanced microdevices
14.1.2 Intel
14.1.3 Hewlett Packard Enterprise (Hpe)
14.1.4IBM
14.1.5 Dell
14.1.6 Lenovo
14.1.7 Fujitsu
14.1.8 Atos
14.1.9 Cisco
14.1.10 Nvidia
14.2 Other Players
14.2.1 Nec Corporation
14.2.2 Amazon Web Services
14.2.3 Oracle
14.2.4Microsoft
14.2.5 Incentive
14.2.6 Netapp
14.2.7 Global Iron
14.2.8 Aspen system
14.2.9 Advanced Bundling Technologies
14.2.10 Dawning Information Industry Co. Ltd. (Sugon)
14.2.11 Dassault Systems
14.2.12 Limited Arming
14.2.13 Mounting technology
14.2.14 Adaptive calculation
14.2.15 Advanced CHP
14.2.16 Datadirect networks
14.2.17 Equus Computers
14.2.18 Excelero
14.2.19 Gigabyte
14.2.20 Penguin Computing

15. Appendix

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/hyyt7v

  • Global High Performance Computing (HPC) Market

        
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Silicon anodes to extend the autonomy of electric vehicles https://topclusters.org/silicon-anodes-to-extend-the-autonomy-of-electric-vehicles/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://topclusters.org/silicon-anodes-to-extend-the-autonomy-of-electric-vehicles/ DUBLIN, November 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The “Growth Opportunities in Powertrains, Autonomous Electric Trucks, Fleet Management and Wireless Charging” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The Mobility TOE for March 2022 covers innovations in powertrains, autonomous electric trucks, fleet management and wireless charging. Some of the key innovations include platforms providing self-driving capability […]]]>

DUBLIN, November 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The “Growth Opportunities in Powertrains, Autonomous Electric Trucks, Fleet Management and Wireless Charging” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The Mobility TOE for March 2022 covers innovations in powertrains, autonomous electric trucks, fleet management and wireless charging. Some of the key innovations include platforms providing self-driving capability to trucks, smart powertrains to electrify electric trucks, autonomous electric trucks for yard operations, cybersecurity solutions for connected vehicles, software for fleet management for ships and artificial intelligence for autonomous vehicles.

The objective of the Mobility Technology TOE is to raise awareness of global technological innovations in self-propelled land mobile platforms that are not only technically significant, but potentially offer commercial value. Each monthly TOE provides subscribers with valuable descriptions and analysis of 10 remarkable innovations. The main focus is on motorway registered motor vehicles (light, medium and heavy). Passenger cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles, scooters and locomotives are part of the product range, powered by any fuel. Many innovations relate to powertrains (internal combustion engines, turbines, electric batteries, fuel cells, electric hybrids), as well as transmissions (including transmissions), interiors – seats and screens, advanced materials – such as for the body/chassis, wireless connectivity and the self-driving technology that’s getting so much attention right now. The Mobility TOE describes and evaluates each innovation, scores the organizations and developers involved, projects the likely time-to-market, provides patent analysis, and provides valuable strategic insights to industry stakeholders.

The Advanced Manufacturing and Automation (AMA) cluster covers technologies that enable clean, lean and flexible manufacturing and industrial automation. Technologies such as three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) printing, wireless sensors and networks, information and communication technologies, multi-material assembly, composite manufacturing, digital manufacturing, micro- and nano-manufacturing, lasers, advanced software and printing techniques, are covered under this group. The technologies covered here impact a wide range of industries, such as semiconductor, automotive and transportation, aerospace and defense, industrial, healthcare, logistics and electronics.

Main topics covered:

Mobility innovations

  • The platform brings autonomous driving to trucks
  • Aurora Innovation’s Value Proposition Brings Autonomous Driving to Multiple Vehicle Types
  • Aurora Innovation-Investor Dashboard
  • Smart powertrain to electrify pickup trucks
  • Magna’s value proposition supports the efficient day-to-day operation of electric vans
  • Magna-Investor Dashboard
  • Silicon anodes to extend the autonomy of electric vehicles
  • Nexeon’s value proposition offers an instant solution to extend lithium-ion battery performance
  • Nexeon-Investor Dashboard
  • Real-Time Solution Streamlines Vehicle Design
  • VI-Grade’s value proposition enables real-time vehicle model export
  • VI-Grade-Investor Dashboard
  • Autonomous Electric Trucks for Yard Operation
  • Outrider Value Proposition
  • Outrider-Investor Dashboard
  • Autonomous mobility solutions for self-driving vehicles
  • Navya’s Value Proposition
  • Navya-Investor Dashboard
  • Cybersecurity solution for connected vehicles
  • Securethings Value Proposition
  • Securethings Investor Dashboard
  • AI-powered video analytics for the automotive manufacturing industry
  • Drishti’s value proposition
  • Drishti Investor Dashboard
  • Fleet management software for ships
  • Orbitmi Value Proposition
  • Orbitmi-Investor Dashboard
  • Plug and play wireless charger for electric vehicles
  • Brightblu’s value proposition
  • Brightblu-Investor Dashboard
  • AI technology for autonomous vehicles
  • Autobrains Value Proposition
  • Autobrains-Investor Dashboard
  • Industry Contacts
  • Key Contacts

Companies cited

  • Aurora Innovation
  • Autobrains
  • Brightblu
  • Drishti
  • magna
  • by Navya
  • Nexeon
  • Orbitmi
  • of the Outrider
  • Secure things
  • VI-Grade

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/f0blcz

Media Contact:

Research and Markets
Laura Woodsenior
[email protected]

For EST office hours, call +1-917-300-0470
For USA/CAN call toll free +1-800-526-8630
For GMT office hours call +353-1-416-8900

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Fax (outside the US): +353-1-481-1716

Logo: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/539438/Research_and_Markets_Logo.jpg

SOURCE Research and Markets

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Researcher: Migration, climate change, disasters and development https://topclusters.org/researcher-migration-climate-change-disasters-and-development/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 08:31:00 +0000 https://topclusters.org/researcher-migration-climate-change-disasters-and-development/ The Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is an independent international research institute founded in 1989. Its mission is to support decision-making and to catalyze and enable change towards sustainable development around the world by providing knowledge which link science and policy in the field of environment and development. SEI ranked second among the world’s most influential […]]]>

The Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is an independent international research institute founded in 1989. Its mission is to support decision-making and to catalyze and enable change towards sustainable development around the world by providing knowledge which link science and policy in the field of environment and development. SEI ranked second among the world’s most influential think tanks on environmental policy issues in the 2020 Global Go To Think Tank Report compiled by the University of Pennsylvania’s Think Tanks and Civil Society Program.

SEI has approximately 320 employees working in research centers in seven countries around the world. SEI’s head office is located in Stockholm, Sweden. Other SEI research centers are located in Colombia (SEI Latin America), Estonia (SEI Tallinn), Kenya (SEI Africa), Thailand (SEI Asia), United Kingdom (SEI York and SEI Oxford) and in the USA.

Based in Bangkok, SEI Asia has a diverse team of multinational experts who integrate scientific research with participatory approaches to co-develop and share knowledge, build partnerships and influence resilient development policies. It focuses on gender equality and social equity, climate adaptation, disaster risk reduction, water insecurity and integrated water resource management, transitional agriculture, renewable energy and urbanization.

SEI Asia is an affiliate of Chulalongkorn University (CU), Thailand. SEI and CU have signed a long-term agreement through 2023 to foster innovative scientific research combined with effective political engagement on development and environmental challenges in Asia. The main areas of collaboration are intellectual engagement for joint research applications and fundraising, conferences and seminars for UC students, postgraduate supervision and review, and linkages among UC staff. ‘UC-SEI.

SEI Asia is recruiting a highly motivated researcher with a strong background in migration, climate change and disaster research. The successful candidate will be based at SEI Asia in Bangkok, Thailand to develop and execute research on the links between climate change, disasters and development with migration and mobility. This exciting position will involve leading high-quality research from concept to policy influence. The researcher will join the Migration and Mobility Hub and SEI’s Global Initiative on Climate Change Adaptation, and contribute to the work of the Climate Change, Disasters and Development cluster and other research clusters as appropriate.

The researcher may also work across multiple disciplines, sectors and teams, including those working on gender, water, urban and disaster issues. The position also provides opportunities to mentor early-career researchers and regularly contribute to building the capacity of multiple actors. A key part of the job is to generate and communicate interdisciplinary research information to a wide range of audiences, including high-quality, peer-reviewed publications, policy briefs, and blog posts or podcasts.

The position is based at SEI Asia in Bangkok, Thailand and will report to the Migration and Mobility Cluster Manager, in coordination with the Climate Change, Disasters and Development Cluster Manager and the SEI Asia Center Director.

Research and policy influence

  • Identify, formulate, develop, lead and implement research and policy dialogue on migration, climate change, disasters and development projects that advance SEI’s goals and objectives
  • Ensure high-quality research processes that lead to peer-reviewed articles and strategic knowledge products such as discussions and policy briefs for different audiences, including policy makers and the media
  • Identify sources of funding, lead or contribute to fundraising and seek funding for projects
  • Contribute to the evolution of programs and the improvement of policies and decision-making through collaboration and the sharing of knowledge and research recommendations in various forms and forums, from local to national, regional and global levels
  • Support capacity building processes, particularly around intersectional gender mainstreaming, with policy, private sector, research and civil society actors.

Development Center

  • Provide guidance, mentorship and supervision to various junior staff in the development and implementation of research, support the professional development of junior research staff and contribute to SEI staff capacity development initiatives
  • Contribute to SEI’s quality assurance processes to ensure the scientific rigor of SEI and partner research, as well as monitoring, evaluation and learning (MEL)
  • In collaboration with the SEI Communications team, facilitate and support internal and external communications and outreach activities, including media presentations, dialogues and articles
  • Identify funding sources, lead and contribute to fundraising for SEI Asia projects aligned with SEI’s mandates and priorities.

Extended SEI Responsibilities

  • Promote SEI’s goals and objectives as stated in its mission and aligned with its 2020-2024 strategy. This includes participating in and contributing to the development of SEI Asia and the climate and migration research theme.
  • Implement projects in a timely manner according to work plans and available budget, cooperating fairly and effectively with partners and support teams.
  • Be a proactive team member, cooperate and support team colleagues and collaborate with other groups within SEI Asia.
  • Ensure a constructive exchange of ideas with relevant institutes, scientists and experts, including other SEI Centres.

You are an experienced social scientist with a keen interest and proven track record in designing and implementing successful research projects in the areas of migration, climate change-related disasters and adaptation. You also have excellent writing skills and are able to communicate with a variety of actors. You are an excellent team player who has good listening skills and the ability to collaborate in diverse and dynamic contexts.

  • PhD with a minimum of 3 years or MSc with a minimum of 6 years of professional research experience on migration, disasters, climate change and development
  • Knowledge of current and cutting-edge migration theories and approaches
  • Successful track record of applied research involving multi-stakeholder engagement and informing policy or development agendas or decision-making, as well as in directing research activities
  • Solid and growing track record in scientific publications, as well as ability to write for a general or practitioner audience
  • Proven ability to successfully design research projects, secure funding, implement and manage quality research projects and deliver effectively in a timely manner
  • Proven experience in proposal writing and fundraising
  • Proficient in quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods approaches, including rigorous design, data collection and analysis
  • Strong motivation, personal initiative and commitment to excellence and results, as well as enthusiasm for scientific research
  • Excellent command of spoken and written English.
  • Asian work experience
  • Demonstrated ability to work flexibly and effectively with a range of partners (government, civil society and/or private sector)
  • Recent or current involvement in migration-related research
  • Demonstrated understanding of the dynamics of migration and mobility in Southeast Asia, or any country in the region, in the context of disasters and climate change and how these affect adaptation to change climatic.
  • Excellent interpersonal, teamwork and communication skills
  • Strong motivation, personal initiative and commitment to excellence and influence through scientific research
  • Proven ability in people management
  • Exceptional analytical, problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Strong planning, organizational and time management skills
  • Convey SEI’s core values ​​in daily work, including the importance of high caliber work, respect and trust.

With a team of over 17 nationalities, SEI welcomes applicants from all over the world for all positions and offers internationally competitive salary and benefits, with all employee contracts under Thai labor law.

SEI is an equal opportunity employer and we consider all applicants on the basis of qualifications and abilities, regardless of and not limited to race, national origin, religious belief, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability and marital status. We are committed to diversity and equality within our organization and candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

We review applications continuously, so please submit your application as soon as possible, but no later than December 14, 202211:59 p.m. local Bangkok time.

Applications should be written in English and consist of a short CV and cover letter highlighting relevant qualifications and experience.

As we only accept applications through our recruitment system, please apply online using the button below and include:

  • Cover letter highlighting relevant qualifications and experience
  • Curriculum vitae.
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AUD/USD Forex Technical Analysis – Traders eye .6548 for break up ahead of US GDP data https://topclusters.org/aud-usd-forex-technical-analysis-traders-eye-6548-for-break-up-ahead-of-us-gdp-data/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 00:50:00 +0000 https://topclusters.org/aud-usd-forex-technical-analysis-traders-eye-6548-for-break-up-ahead-of-us-gdp-data/ The Aussie dollar is heading higher early Thursday after hitting its highest level since Oct. 6 of the previous session. The rally was fueled by speculation that the US Federal Reserve would announce a slower pace of interest rate hikes from December at next week’s monetary policy meeting. Hopes for a Fed decision are fueled […]]]>

The Aussie dollar is heading higher early Thursday after hitting its highest level since Oct. 6 of the previous session. The rally was fueled by speculation that the US Federal Reserve would announce a slower pace of interest rate hikes from December at next week’s monetary policy meeting.

Hopes for a Fed decision are fueled by weaker-than-expected US housing data this week and a contraction in the PMI report on business activity.

Daily AUD/USD

Daily Swing Chart Technical Analysis

The main trend is down according to the daily swing chart. However, the trend is downward. A trade through .6548 will change the main trend to the upside. A move through .6170 will signal a resumption of the downtrend.

The minor trend is also up. This is momentum control. A trade through .6211 will change the minor downtrend.

AUD/USD closed on the strong side of a long-term Fibonacci level at 0.6466, making it a support. Next support is a minor pivot at .6341.

On the upside, resistance is an intermediate 50% level at 0.6543, followed by an intermediate 61.8% level at 0.6631.

Daily Swing Chart Technical Forecast

Traders’ reaction to the long-term Fibonacci level at 0.6466 should determine the direction of AUD/USD on Thursday.

Bullish scenario

A sustained move above 0.6466 will indicate the presence of buyers. If this creates enough bullish momentum, look for a push into the resistance cluster between 0.6543 and 0.6548. Breaking out of .6548 will change the main trend to the upside and could trigger a peak at .6631.

Downside scenario

A sustained move below .6465 will signal the presence of sellers. If this generates enough downside momentum, expect selling to eventually extend to the minor pivot at 0.6340.

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Study: Diet Adherence Linked to Lower Gut Inflammation https://topclusters.org/study-diet-adherence-linked-to-lower-gut-inflammation/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 13:19:11 +0000 https://topclusters.org/study-diet-adherence-linked-to-lower-gut-inflammation/ Researchers in Canada have shown that following a dietary program similar to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better microbiome composition and lower intestinal inflammation. Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that causes tissues in the digestive tract to swell and often leads to abdominal pain and malnutrition. Although its causes are unknown, previous […]]]>

Researchers in Canada have shown that following a dietary program similar to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better microbiome composition and lower intestinal inflammation.

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that causes tissues in the digestive tract to swell and often leads to abdominal pain and malnutrition. Although its causes are unknown, previous studies suggest that diet is an important risk factor for Crohn’s disease.

This study suggests that an intervention aimed at preventing the onset of the disease should take into account the basic microbiome, as well as a certain diet, which can only be beneficial depending on the presence of a certain profile. of microbiome.– Williams Turpin, Researcher, Mount Sinai Hospital Toronto

Other studies have shown that patients with Crohn’s disease also have different microbial compositions than healthy people, leading researchers to hypothesize that the two are related.

To test the hypothesis, the researchers collected stool samples from 2,289 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with Crohn’s disease and had them complete validated food frequency questionnaires asking about their diet during the course of the study. of the previous year.

See also:Health info

The researchers identified three groups of food and microbial composition based on their analysis. One of the groups resembled the Mediterranean diet, one resembled a Western diet, and the last food group was a hybrid.

The researchers found that people on a MedDiet-like diet generally had a microbial makeup with an abundance of fiber-degrading bacteria – Ruminococcus and Faecalibacterium – and significantly lower levels of gut inflammation.

This is likely due to the increased amount of fiber associated with higher consumption of leafy greens, grains, and other fiber-rich foods. [in the MedDiet]said Williams Turpin, a researcher at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto and lead author of the study. Olive Oil Times.

In this environment, microbes capable of degrading fiber (which is not digested by the host) have an ecological advantage, which may promote their abundance in humans consuming higher fiber foods,” he added. .

There was no evidence to suggest that eating a single food directly led to a more diverse microbiome. However, says Turpin, olive oil showed a trend of increased microbiome diversity,” but a weak association with lower inflammation in the expected direction.

Despite the opacity between the links between single foods and gut microbiome diversity and subclinical inflammation, the links to long-term dietary patterns are more evident.

Our study demonstrated that the lower level of subclinical inflammation could be related to both diet and the associated microbiome,” Turpin said. This conclusion is supported by a causal inference analysis demonstrating that 47% of the anti-inflammatory properties of the Mediterranean-type diet were mediated by the microbiome.

This also means that a Mediterranean-type diet has a direct effect on subclinical inflammation (53%),” he added. We believe that a fiber-degrading microbiome can produce beneficial short-chain fatty acids known for their anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.

Turpin said the study results could help guide future dietary strategies that affect microbial composition and host gut inflammation to prevent disease.

This study suggests that an intervention aimed at preventing the onset of the disease should take into account the basic microbiome, as well as a certain diet, which can only be beneficial depending on the presence of a certain profile. microbiome,” he said.

This is especially true as this study identified that certain bacteria contribute to the anti-inflammatory potential of a Mediterranean diet,” Turpin added.

The results of this study complement those of a 2020 study which found that patients with Crohn’s disease who followed a Mediterranean diet, including olive oil, for six months saw their condition improve. .

Instead of focusing on gut microbiomes, the researchers looked at the relationship between weight and disease. Obese patients with Crohn’s disease following the Mediterranean diet saw their body mass index drop at the same time as the onset of their symptoms.


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MOST and HRQL indices in recurrent ovarian cancer https://topclusters.org/most-and-hrql-indices-in-recurrent-ovarian-cancer/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 11:29:04 +0000 https://topclusters.org/most-and-hrql-indices-in-recurrent-ovarian-cancer/ Patients with recurrent ovarian cancer can assess the effectiveness and safety of palliative chemotherapy using the Concerns of Measurement of Ovarian Symptoms and Treatment (MOST); a validated patient-reported symptom assessment instrument for recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). This research aims to determine if there is a correlation between MOST symptom indices and essential markers of health-related […]]]>

Patients with recurrent ovarian cancer can assess the effectiveness and safety of palliative chemotherapy using the Concerns of Measurement of Ovarian Symptoms and Treatment (MOST); a validated patient-reported symptom assessment instrument for recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). This research aims to determine if there is a correlation between MOST symptom indices and essential markers of health-related quality of life and if symptoms within MOST symptom indices tend to cluster with the quality of health-related life (HRQL). At baseline and before each cycle of chemotherapy, a prospective group of women with ROC completed the MOST-T35, EORTC QLQ-C30, and EORTC QLQ-OV28 questionnaires. Data collected at the start and end of treatment were analyzed. Clusters of co-occurring symptoms were found using exploratory factor analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis. Correlations between MOST symptom indices and HRQOL were analyzed using trajectory models. Sample size was calculated by comparing the number of women who completed all 22 symptom-specific MOST items and at least 1 HRQoL measure at baseline (762) and at end of treatment (681). At the start and end of treatment, 4 clusters of symptoms appeared: gastrointestinal symptoms, symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, nausea and vomiting, and psychological symptoms. Lower scores in the QLQ-C30 and OV28 functioning domains and lower general health were associated with higher levels of psychological (MOST-Psych) and disease/treatment-related (MOST-DorT) symptoms. Statistical approaches and periods agreed on 4 groups of MOST symptoms. These results indicate that MOST is a promising intervention for improving HRQoL, especially when combined with appropriate referral pathways for symptom management for use in clinical practice.

Source: sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090825822003353

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Bilberry, a tasty intervention against age-related cognitive decline https://topclusters.org/bilberry-a-tasty-intervention-against-age-related-cognitive-decline/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 01:19:00 +0000 https://topclusters.org/bilberry-a-tasty-intervention-against-age-related-cognitive-decline/ In a recent study published in the Nutritional neuroscience journal, researchers assessed the impact of wild blueberry consumption on the rate of transformation in mild cognitive decline. According to a 2016 study, 39% of people over the age of 65 had significant cognitive problems, and 68% of them could not live independently. The impact of […]]]>

In a recent study published in the Nutritional neuroscience journal, researchers assessed the impact of wild blueberry consumption on the rate of transformation in mild cognitive decline.

According to a 2016 study, 39% of people over the age of 65 had significant cognitive problems, and 68% of them could not live independently. The impact of the aging US population can be mitigated by interventions that have the potential to prevent or reduce the development of cognitive impairment in the aging population. Evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet, which includes fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish, wine and olive oil, is linked to brain health, with various polyphenols appearing as potential promoters of health.

Study: A six-month intervention with wild blueberries improved processing speed in mild cognitive decline: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Image Credit: Mircea Costina/Shutterstock

About the study

In the current study, the researchers hypothesized that regular consumption of wild blueberries might increase processing speed, a cognitive skill that underpins all other cognitive abilities.

A total of 296 adults were recruited from the Southeastern United States community aged 65-80. These volunteers were recruited through public events, churches, online publications, media and word of mouth. After an in-person screening visit, 133 of them met the inclusion criteria.

Participants were considered eligible if they had a body mass index (BMI) less than 33, were not taking certain medications, including those with known cognitive side effects or cerebral blood flow restrictions, and had no a history of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, psychiatric disorders, central nervous system disorders, gastrointestinal or digestive problems, or diabetes. Those eligible also consumed less than five daily servings of fruits and vegetables. The sample was 44% male and 97% self-identified Caucasian.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment lasting six months was performed. Based on the results of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) during screening, 86 people were identified as having mild cognitive deterioration. The study coordinator randomized these participants to be treated with 35 g of freeze-dried wild blueberry powder or a matching caloric placebo each day. Participants without aging-related cognitive problems were included in a comparison group.

The Wild Blueberry Association of North America provided freeze-dried wild blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium). The placebo maltodextrin and fructose were combined with artificial and organic flavors and colors. The blind was kept by an administrative staff member outside the laboratory, kept in a sealed envelope. Twice a year the nutrient content was reviewed. A month’s supply of powder packets was provided to intervention participants in insulated lunch bags, each labeled with the date of consumption.

The Stressful Life Events Scale was used to assess stress in an individual’s life. The Physical Activity Scale for Older Adults was used to measure physical activity (PASE). Participants were randomized into intervention or control groups based on their MoCA scores. The MoCA was used as a classification tool. The MoCA was developed to quickly and accurately test for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV), was used to assess cognitive abilities and intelligence in people aged 16-90. A computerized battery of standardized cognitive tests called CANTAB was used.

Results

The results of the study showed that a post hoc Tukey test found no difference between the blueberry and placebo groups in education or intelligence quotient (IQ). However, by design, it was discovered that the reference group and the intervention groups had different MoCA screening scores. Also, Spatial Working Memory (SWM) Total Errors, Associated Pair Learning (PAL) Mean Trials of Success, Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP) Total Successes, and Latency Mean RVP were included in a MANOVA with the different groups considered the between-factor subjects.

The results of the multivariate analyzes of the three groups including the IQ scores revealed a between-subjects influence of the group on the mean PVR latency. None of the other dependent variables showed statistically significant group differences. There was also no significance noted in the multivariate model. Over the six-month intervention period, latency (processing speed) for the blueberry group increased but did not differ significantly from the change in latency for the reference group. When the intervention groups were analyzed without the comparison group, the pattern of results was the same, with mean RVP latency now showing a more significant between-subjects effect on the group.

In the frontal group, post hoc analysis showed a tendency for blueberry intervention individuals to outperform placebo participants. Multivariate statistics did not show significance in analyzes that also took into account the additional factor of age group. Nevertheless, similar patterns were found: the major group effect was almost statistically significant in the frontal, left frontal and right frontal clusters.

Maximum amplitude data for 75 to 80 year olds were also processed by a simplified model. Multivariate tests did not yield any significant results. Frontal, central, and median clusters demonstrated a significant group main effect in the between-subjects adjusted model. In all cases, the blueberry group fared better than the placebo group.

Overall, the study results demonstrated that regular consumption of wild blueberries can increase processing speed, especially in people aged 75 to 80. According to the researchers, the present study will allow the development of an animal model that could help identify the mechanisms by which blueberries promote brain function.

Journal reference:

  • Carol L. Cheatham, L. Grant Canipe III, Grace Millsap, Julie M. Stegall, Sheau Ching Chai, Kelly W. Sheppard and Mary Ann Lila (2022), Six-month intervention with wild blueberries improved processing speed in mild cognitive decline: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial., Nutritional Neuroscience, DOI: https://www.doi.org/10.1080/1028415X.2022.2117475, https://www.tandfonline.com /doi/full/ 10.1080/1028415X.2022.2117475
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Enrichment and proteomic identification of the Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst wall | Parasites and vectors https://topclusters.org/enrichment-and-proteomic-identification-of-the-cryptosporidium-parvum-oocyst-wall-parasites-and-vectors/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:00:46 +0000 https://topclusters.org/enrichment-and-proteomic-identification-of-the-cryptosporidium-parvum-oocyst-wall-parasites-and-vectors/ Platts-Mills JA, Babji S, Bodhidatta L, Gratz J, Haque R, Havt A, et al. Specific pathogen burdens of community-acquired diarrhea in developing countries: a multisite birth cohort study (MAL-ED). Lancet Global Health. 2015;3:e564–75. PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar Checkley W, White AC Jr, Jaganath D, Arrowood MJ, Chalmers RM, Chen XM, et al. A review […]]]>
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    Shockwaves from meteoroids help scientists locate new craters on Mars | March https://topclusters.org/shockwaves-from-meteoroids-help-scientists-locate-new-craters-on-mars-march/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 16:03:00 +0000 https://topclusters.org/shockwaves-from-meteoroids-help-scientists-locate-new-craters-on-mars-march/ Researchers have located new craters on Mars using shock waves caused by chunks of space rock as they smash through the sky and crash into the ground. The new scars on the face of the planet are the first impact craters ever traced from the bang and crash of meteoroids bombarding another planet. The results […]]]>

    Researchers have located new craters on Mars using shock waves caused by chunks of space rock as they smash through the sky and crash into the ground.

    The new scars on the face of the planet are the first impact craters ever traced from the bang and crash of meteoroids bombarding another planet. The results will help scientists get a clearer idea of ​​how often Mars is battered by rocky detritus in the solar system and sharpen their understanding of the deep internal structure of our neighboring planet.

    “This is the first time that we have felt and heard an impact on another planet,” said Professor Raphael Garcia, a planetary seismologist at the Higher Institute of Aeronautics and Space at the University of Toulouse.

    To see if they could find craters produced by incoming meteoroids on Mars, the researchers examined seismic waves recorded by Nasa’s InSight lander between May 2020 and September 2021. The probe touched down in the expanse arid Elysium Planitia in November 2018 during a fact-finding mission. the planet’s structure, crust and impact activity.

    Scientists expected InSight to detect between one and 100 impacts every five Earth years using a sensitive seismometer deployed on the Martian surface. The seismic data recorded by the probe included four impact events that the researchers explored in detail.

    By knowing the speed at which acoustic and seismic waves pass through Martian air and rock, the team estimated how far from InSight the various meteoroids hit the surface. They then developed the direction.

    The loud bang on impact sends acoustic waves racing across the surface in all directions. These deform the ground imperceptibly, but Insight’s data was so sensitive that the team picked up the direction of the impact from the slight tilt of the seismometer as the acoustic wave swept through.

    The analysis allowed scientists to predict approximately where incoming meteoroids crashed onto the surface. To check for signs of new craters, they turned to images taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Before and after images from this probe revealed new black spots on the ground – freshly formed craters near the expected impact sites.

    A meteoroid reached Mars on September 5, 2021 and triggered three brutal shock waves. The first came when it slammed into the Martian atmosphere at about 10 kilometers per second, creating a shock wave along its path. The space rock then exploded at an altitude of between 13 and 16 km, producing multiple fragments. These then slammed into the ground, creating a group of new craters several meters wide.

    The data is extremely valuable to planetary scientists studying the structure of Mars’ crust, as the source of seismic waves can be traced back to the crater. But impact craters are also used as cosmic clocks, with older surfaces on planets and moons filled with more craters than younger ones.

    “If people want to know if a surface is older or younger, knowing the impact rate is key, but we’re not there yet,” Garcia said. Details are published in Nature Geoscience.

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